Wednesday, February 29, 2012

China Has A Gigantic Obesity Problem

China's economic prosperity has led to a health crisis growing with alarming rates in the country – obesity.
19 million Chinese are considered obese and millions more are overweight. Food shortage is no longer a problem and the diet of the Chinese has changed dramatically from mainly rice and vegetables to include more meat, milk and sweets. The result – one out of 70 people in China is obese. (via PBS) More and more fat reduction hospitals are springing up all over the country using fire treatments, acupuncture and cupping treatment to help obese Chinese lose the weight.

Reuters
Liang Yong, 30, who weights about 230 kg (507 pounds) and is 1.58 metres (5.18 feet) tall, is pushed on to a cart by his father (L) after a medical examination at a hospital in Chongqing municipality May 27, 2010. Liang is not able to walk due to his weight and is required to seek further medical treatment at the hospital. REUTERS/Stringer

Patients undergoing fire treatment in a weight loss facility.

Patients undergoing fire treatment in a weight loss facility.
Reuters
Patients undergo fire treatment, a traditional Chinese medicine therapy, at a weight loss centre in Changchun, Jilin province in northeastern China June 20, 2010. The treatment process includes massaging parts of the patient, wrapping the areas with towels, adding Chinese medicated liquor onto the towels and igniting them. Doctors at the clinic believe besides reducing excess body fat, this technique is able to improve blood circulation and prevent common colds. The centre, established in 2004, is currently treating more than 100 obese patients from all over China. Each course of treatment, lasting about a month, costs about 4,000 yuan ($587). Picture taken June 20, 2010. REUTERS/Sheng Li

The treatment process includes massaging parts of the patient, wrapping the areas with towels, adding Chinese medicated liquor onto the towels and igniting them.

The treatment process includes massaging parts of the patient, wrapping the areas with towels, adding Chinese medicated liquor onto the towels and igniting them.
Reuters
An overweight Chinese man tries to lose weight through a burning fire therapy treatment at a beauty salon in Hefei, east China's Anhui province May 20, 2005. A survey jointly released by the Ministry of Health and the State Statistics Bureau last October shows that, in China's big cities, 30 per cent of the total population is now overweight, as compared with 21 per cent in 1992. Picture taken on May 20, 2005. REUTERS/China

 

Cupping treatment involves creating negative pressures within glass containers, which are then inverted and placed onto the back of a patient.

Cupping treatment involves creating negative pressures within glass containers, which are then inverted and placed onto the back of a patient.
Reuters
A patient undergoes cupping treatment at a weight loss centre in Changchun, Jilin province June 21, 2010. Cupping treatment involves creating negative pressures within glass containers, which are then inverted and placed onto the back of a patient. Doctors at the clinic believe the technique is able to cleanse the body of impurities and improve blood circulation as well as the flow of "qi", known as the body's "vital energy" in Mandarin. The centre, established in 2004, is currently treating more than 100 obese patients from all over China. Each course of treatment, lasting about a month, costs about 4,000 yuan ($587). REUTERS/Sheng Li

Obese patient receives acupuncture treatment.

Obese patient receives acupuncture treatment.
Reuters
Obese patient receives acupuncture treatment from Chinese doctor at fat reduction hospital in Tianjin, China. Patient Du Bing, 17 (L), from Hebei Province, receives acupuncture treatment from a Chinese doctor at the Aimin Fat Reduction Hospital in Tianjin, China March 21, 2005. The hospital, which attracts obese people from China as well as several Asian countries, uses a combination of acupuncture, diet and intense exercise to help patients shed weight. Picture taken March 21. REUTERS/Mark Ralston

And more conventional weight loss treatment -- exercise.

And more conventional weight loss treatment -- exercise.
Reuters
Patients perform aerobics at the Aimin Fat Reduction Hospital in the city of Tianjin, China in this picture taken March 21, 2005. The hospital, which attracts obese people from China as well as several Asian countries, uses a combination of acupuncture, diet and intensive exercises to help patients shed weight. Picture taken march 21, 2005. REUTERS/Mark Ralston RKR/KS

 

After shedding the pounds, next step is cosmetic surgery.

After shedding the pounds, next step is cosmetic surgery.
Reuters
Meng Qinggan, 27, from Heilongjiang province, receives a medical examination before an operation to remove his excess skin at a hospital in Tianjin municipality September 10, 2007. Meng reduced his weight from 265 kilograms (585 pounds) to 110 kilograms (243 pounds) in 320 days between 2000 and 2001, local media reported. REUTERS/Stringer

No comments:

Post a Comment