Sunday, April 10, 2011

Acupuncture Points Database - Lung Channel



































LOCATION NOTE
i. Ask the patient to extend their hand forwards whilst you
apply resistance to their hand, in order to emphasise the
delto-pectoral triangle. First locate Yunmen LU-2 in the
centre of the triangle, then locate Zhongfu LU-1 in the
intercostal space approximately one cun inferior and
slightly lateral to it; ii. To locate the first intercostal space,
first locate the costal cartilage of the second rib which is
level with the sternal angle, then locate the first intercostal
space above it.
NEEDLING
Transverse-oblique insertion 0.5 to 1 cun medially along
the intercostal space.
Caution: deep perpendicular or oblique insertion carries
a substantial risk of causing a pneumothorax.
ACTIONS
Disseminates and descends Lung qi and alleviates
cough and wheezing
Transforms phlegm, clears heat and regulates the
water passages
Descends Stomach qi
INDICATIONS
• Cough, coughing turbid phlegm, coughing blood
and pus, dyspnoea, wheezing, asthma, fullness of the
chest, chest pain, breathing with raised shoulders,
oppression of the chest and difficulty in breathing,
diminished qi with inability to lie down.
• Heat in the chest, aversion to cold, chills and fever,
sweating.
• Throat painful obstruction, nasal congestion, swelling
of the face.
• Difficult ingestion, vomiting, Gall Bladder heat vomiting,
retching, abdominal distention.
• Skin pain, running piglet qi with lumbar pain, goitre,
pain of the upper back and shoulder.


































LOCATION NOTE
Ask the patient to extend their hand forwards whilst you
apply resistance to their hand, in order to emphasise the
delto-pectoral triangle, and locate Yunmen LU-2 at its
centre.
NEEDLING
Transverse-oblique insertion 0.5 to 1 cun.
Caution: deep perpendicular or oblique insertion carries
a substantial risk of causing a pneumothorax.
ACTIONS
Clears Lung heat and disseminates and descends Lung qi
Dispels agitation and fullness
INDICATIONS
• Cough, wheezing, asthma, dyspnoea with inability
to lie down, shortness of breath, oppressive and
agitated sensation in the chest, heat in the chest,
oppression and pain in the chest, upsurging of qi to
the Heart, sudden pain of the Heart and abdomen.
• Pain of the lateral costal region and back, pain of the
back and shoulders, pain of the shoulder with inability
to raise the arm, pain of the supraclavicular fossa.
• Interrupted pulse which cannot be felt at the cun
position, throat painful obstruction, goitre, injury by
cold giving rise to persistent heat in the limbs.



































LOCATION NOTE
Divide the distance between the axillary fold and the
cubital crease of the elbow into equal thirds. Tianfu LU-3
is at the junction of the upper and middle third.
NEEDLING
Perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1 cun. Note: according to
several classical texts, this point is contraindicated to
moxibustion. The Systematic Classic of Acupuncture and
Moxibustion says that if moxa is used it will cause
counterflow and disordered qi.
ACTIONS
Clears Lung heat and descends Lung qi
Cools blood and stops bleeding
Calms the corporeal soul (po)
INDICATIONS
• Wheezing, dyspnoea, cough, asthma, nosebleed,
spitting blood, coughing blood, much spittle.
• Somnolence, insomnia, sadness, weeping, disorientation
and forgetfulness, floating corpse ghost-talk,
melancholy crying ghost talk.
• Goitre, swelling of the throat, pain of the inner
(antero-lateral) aspect of the upper arm, dizziness,
swelling and distention of the body, malaria, purplewhite
wind blotches (pityriasis versicolor), visual
dizziness, short-sightedness.

































LOCATION NOTE
Divide the distance between the axillary fold and the
cubital crease of the elbow into equal thirds and locate
Xiabai LU-4 one cun inferior to the junction of the upper
and middle third (Tianfu LU-3).
NEEDLING
Perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1 cun.
ACTIONS
Descends Lung qi
Regulates qi and blood in the chest
INDICATIONS
• Cough, dyspnoea, asthma, shortness of breath.
• Heart pain, palpitations, agitation and fullness,
retching.
• Pain in the medial aspect of the arm, purple-white
wind blotches (pityriasis versicolor).

































LOCATION NOTE
i. Locate slightly lateral to the tendon rather than immediately
next to it; ii. Locate and needle with the elbow
slightly flexed, avoiding the cubital vein.
NEEDLING
Perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1 cun.
ACTIONS
Clears heat from the Lung and descends rebellious qi
Regulates the water passages
Activates the channel
Relaxes the sinews and alleviates pain
INDICATIONS
• Cough, coughing phlegm, asthma, wheezing, dyspnoea,
shortness of breath, agitation and fullness of
the chest.
• Tidal fever, taxation fever, shivering, malaria, dry
mouth and tongue, throat painful obstruction, tendency
to sneeze.
• Spitting blood, coughing blood, nosebleed, vomiting
blood.
• Vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal distention.
• Swelling of the four limbs, enuresis, frequent urination.
• Pain of the lateral costal region, Heart pain, agitation
of the Heart, sobbing with grief, acute and chronic
childhood fright wind, epilepsy, clonic spasm.
• Coldness of the shoulder, pain of the upper arm and
shoulder, inability to raise the arm to the head, wandering
painful obstruction of the elbow and upper
arm, restricted movement of the elbow, elbow pain,
difficulty in opening and extending the hand, the five
types of lumbar pain, crane’s knee swelling and pain.


































LOCATION NOTE
Divide the distance between Taiyuan LU-9 and Chize
LU-5 into half. Kongzui LU-6 is in a palpable depression
1 cun proximal to this midpoint.
NEEDLING
Perpendicular or oblique insertion 0.5 to 1.5 cun.
ACTIONS
Disseminates and descends Lung qi
Clears heat and moistens the Lung
Clears heat and stops bleeding
Moderates acute conditions
Chize LU-5
Kongzui LU-6
Taiyuan LU-9
5 cun 7 cun
INDICATIONS
• Cough, wheezing, asthma, chest pain, swelling and
pain of the throat, loss of voice, febrile disease with
absence of sweating.
• Coughing blood, spitting blood, vomiting blood,
hiccup.
• Severe pain of the elbow and upper arm, inability to
raise the arm above the head, difficulty in flexing and
extending the fingers, epigastric pain, haemorrhoids,
headache, clonic spasm.


































LOCATION NOTE
If the forefinger is placed at Yangxi L.I.-5, in the anatomical
snuffbox, and moved directly proximally over the full
extent of the styloid process of the radius, the finger falls
into the cleft between the two tendons.
NEEDLING
With the fingers of one hand pinch up the skin over the
point, and with the other hand needle transversely in a
proximal or distal direction, 0.5 to 1 cun, avoiding the
cephalic vein.
ACTIONS
Releases the exterior and expels wind
Promotes the descending function of the Lung
Pacifies wind and phlegm
Benefits the head and nape
Opens and regulates the Conception vessel
Regulates the water passages
Activates the channel and alleviates pain
INDICATIONS
• Chills and fever, nasal congestion and discharge,
nasal polyps, flaring of the nostrils, throat painful
obstruction, cough, coughing up phlegm, wheezing,
dyspnoea, asthma, diminished qi and shortness of
breath, heat of the chest and back, shivering and cold
of the chest and back, sweating, sudden swelling of
the four limbs, thirst, inversion counterflow of the
four limbs.
• Headache and stiffness of the neck and nape, onesided
headache, lockjaw, hemiplegia, deviation of
the mouth and eye, toothache, epilepsy, childhood
fright-epilepsy, acute childhood fright wind, loss of
consciousness, vomiting of foamy (watery) saliva,
wind painful obstruction, hypertension.
• Retention of lochia, retention of the dead foetus,
post-partum inability to speak, blood in the urine,
hot and painful urination, difficult urination, pain of
the penis, pain of the genitals, seminal emission.
• Poor memory, palpitations, propensity to laughter,
frequent yawning and stretching, tension of the chest
and back, fullness of the lateral costal region, breast
abscess.
• Weakness or pain of the wrist and hand, pain of the
thumb, shoulder pain, heat in the palm, malaria.

































LOCATION NOTE
If the forefinger is placed on Taiyuan LU-9 and moved
proximally over the palpable styloid process of the
radius, it will naturally fall into the depression where
Jingqu LU-8 is located.
NEEDLING
Oblique proximal or perpendicular insertion 0.3 to 0.5
cun, avoiding the radial artery.
ACTIONS
Descends Lung qi and alleviates cough and wheezing
INDICATIONS
• Cough, asthma, wheezing, dyspnoea, distention and
pain of the chest and upper back, sore throat, throat
painful obstruction, febrile disease with absence of
sweating, febrile disease with breathlessness, heat in
the palms.
• Heart pain with vomiting, wrist pain, malaria, much
yawning, pain in the soles of the feet.





































LOCATION NOTE
The location of this point is normally given in relation to
the crease of the wrist. Since wrist creases are a superficial
and variable anatomical feature, it is better to locate this
point in relation to the nearby pisiform bone: first locate
Shenmen HE-7 at the lower border of the pisiform bone,
then find Taiyuan LU-9 at the same level.
NEEDLING
Perpendicular insertion 0.3 to 0.5 cun, avoiding the radial
artery.
ACTIONS
Tonifies the Lung and transforms phlegm
Promotes the descending function of the Lung
Regulates and harmonises the one hundred vessels
Activates the channel and alleviates pain
INDICATIONS
• Cough, cough with watery phlegm, asthma, wheezing,
dyspnoea, shortness of breath, much yawning,
heat in the palms, dry throat, oppression and agitation
of the chest with difficult breathing and inability
to lie down.
• Spitting blood, coughing blood, vomiting blood, agitation
with Heart pain accompanied by choppy
pulse, manic raving, pulseless syndrome.
• Rebellion of Stomach qi, belching, superficial visual
obstruction, redness and pain of the eyes, cold shivering,
cold inversion, toothache, head wind, swelling
of the face.
• Weakness or pain of the wrist, pain of the shoulder
and back, pain of the supraclavicular fossa, pain in
the inner aspect of the arm, breast pain.

































LOCATION NOTE
Locate and needle close to the border of the metacarpal
bone.
NEEDLING
Perpendicular insertion 0.5 to 1 cun.
ACTIONS
Benefits the throat
Clears Lung heat
Descends rebellious qi
Harmonises the Stomach and Heart
INDICATIONS
• Throat painful obstruction, sore throat, dry throat,
loss of voice.
• Cough with absence of sweating, cough leading to hypogastric
or sacral pain, cough accompanied by hiccup,
shortness of breath with Heart painful obstruction, diminished
qi with Heart painful obstruction, chest painful
obstruction with inability to catch the breath.
• Deficiency heat, heat in the body, aversion to cold, attack
of wind and cold after intake of alcohol leading
to chills and fever.
• Coughing blood, vomiting blood, blood in the urine.
• Agitation of the Heart, sadness and fear, anger and
mania, sadness and anger with counterflow qi, Heart
painful obstruction with fear and fright.
• Yellow tongue coating, breast abscess, toothache,
lacrimation, visual dizziness, genital damp itching,
impotence with abdominal distention, headache,
malaria, tetany.
• Abdominal pain with inability to eat or drink, sudden
turmoil disorder, oesophageal constriction due
to middle jiao deficiency, vomiting, childhood nutritional
impairment.
• Heat and pain of the palm and thumb, contraction of
the elbow with distention and fullness of the arm.


































NEEDLING
Perpendicular or oblique insertion directed proximally
0.1 to 0.2 cun, or prick to bleed.
ACTIONS
Revives consciousness
Clears heat and benefits the throat
INDICATIONS
• Loss of consciousness from windstroke, loss of consciousness,
cold inversion, hot inversion.
• Sore throat, throat painful obstruction, childhood
throat moth, mumps, lotus flower tongue, nosebleed,
dry lips with desire to drink, febrile disease with cold
shivering.
• Agitation (of the Heart) with cough and dyspnoea,
fullness of the Heart with sweating, fullness below
the Heart, mania, childhood fright wind, malaria,
vomiting.
• Pain and contraction of the wrist, pain of the thumb,
heat of the palms, painful obstruction of the upper
arm, pain of the front of the ear.




Acupuncture Five Elements


The Meridian Organ Clock






What is a Cun Measurement?

The cun is a measurement relative to the patients body that is used to find acupuncture points. Generally speaking one cun is equal to the space between the distal interphalangeal joint and the proximal interphalangeal joint on the middle finger. However, this cun can only be used on certain parts of the body when finding acupuncture points - on other points you use other relative landmarks. For example, the space from nipple to nipple is 8 cun and this 8 cun can be used to find points on the chest - the space from the center of the patella to the lateral malleolus is 16 cun and this 16 cun can be used to find points on the legs, etc. These cun landmark relationships are found within the "General" link for each meridian under the "Measurements Needed" section.

For Quick Cun Measurement





Acupuncture Channel and Collateral Illustration














Acupuncture Channel and Collateral

INTRODUCTION
'Channels and collaterals' is a translation of the Chinese
term 'jingluo'. ‘Jing’ has a geographical connotation and
means a channel (e.g. a water channel) or longitude. In
this book it is translated as ‘channels’, elsewhere as ‘meridians’.
Using the image of a tree, the ‘jing’ are like the
trunk and main branches of the channel network. They
generally run longitudinally through the body at a relatively
deep level, and connect with the internal zangfu.
Specifically they comprise the twelve primary channels,
the eight extraordinary vessels and the twelve divergent
channels. ‘Luo’ means ‘to attach’ or ‘a net’, and refers to
the finer branches of the channel network which are more
superficial and interconnect the trunk and main branches
(jing), the connective tissues and cutaneous regions. In
this book they are referred to in general as the collaterals,
and more specifically as the luo-connecting channels.
There are fifteen luo-connecting channels, the twelve that
belong to the twelve primary channels, the luo-connecting
channels of the Conception and Governing vessels,
and the great luo-connecting channel of the Spleen. The
general category of the collaterals also includes the myriad
‘minute’ collaterals that are distributed throughout the
body. In addition to the jing and luo, there are twelve
sinew channels and twelve cutaneous regions.
Whilst a typical chart of the acupuncture channels,
therefore, illustrates only the superficial pathways of the
twelve primary channels, we should remember that the
channel network is considerably more complex than this,
and there is no part of the body, no kind of tissue, no single
cell, that is not supplied by the channels. Like a tree, the
trunk and main branches define the main structure, whilst
ever finer branches, twigs and leaves spread out to every
part.
The study of the channels in traditional Chinese medicine
can be said to be the equivalent of the study of
anatomy in Western medicine. Chinese medicine paid
scant attention to the physical structure of the interior of
the body, and references to the shape and location of the
internal zangfu in classical texts are few and very brief.
Furthermore there was no study of the distribution of the
nerves, or the origin and insertion of the muscles. Traditional
Chinese medicine did, however, describe in minute
detail the pathways of the wide variety of channels that
serve to circulate the qi and blood to every part of the
body. The channels penetrate the zangfu and the extraordinary
fu in the deepest levels of the body and connect
with the skin, muscles, flesh, tendons, and bones, the head,
body and limbs, and the sense organs, linking all the tissues
and structures of the body into an integrated whole.